COVID-19

Get latest updates, multilingual resources, and details of Gov. Inslee's Stay Home, Stay Healthy order: Coronavirus.wa.gov

WDVA COVID-19 Updates for State Veterans Homes, THP, and WDVA Offices

Services available during COVID-19 Central Office is video, phone, and email appointments only.  1-800-562-2308 or benefits@dva.wa.gov

 

VTSC Events

Upcoming or On-going Training

From: January 1, 2018 at 12:00am (never ends)

Trainer(s): Conference Speakers & Presenters

Details: Click the "register" button for PsychArmor courses offered exclusively for VTSC participants!

Objectives: Course offerings include:

  • Creating a Military Friendly Culture and Onboarding Program
  • Connecting with the VA
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Developing a Military Awareness Program on Campus
  • Coming Soon! Hiring & Retaining National Guard & Reserve Members

Cost: Free!

Free CEs & Clock Hours: Workshop certificate documents hours of instruction toward Continuing Education. Clock-hour forms are available free upon completion of the workshop.
The Veterans Training Support Center is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. VTSC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

From: January 1, 2018 at 9:00am (never ends)

Trainer(s): John Phillips, M.A.Ed. | Conference Speakers & Presenters

Details:

Established in 2011 and funded in part by the Washington Department of Veterans Affairs and the King County Veterans and Human Services Levy, the purpose of the Veterans Training Support Center (VTSC), through continuing education opportunities and professional development, is to raise awareness and understanding on invisible wounds, reintegration and readjustment issues, resources, establish promising best practices that can better serve and assist veterans and their families, and to continue one's journey of veteran cultural competence.

Past trainings have included:

  • Better Serving Those Who Served
  • Supporting Our Veterans & Their Families
  • Communication that Makes a Difference
  • Helping Veterans Crack the Job Market in Difficult Times
  • Understanding Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • safeTALK
  • Understanding Military Sexual Trauma

We have the capacity and expertise to customize trainings based upon the needs of your organization.

Objectives:

Contact us to arrange a training specially designed to meet the needs of your staff and clients.

Contact: John Phillips
Phone: (206) 375-0784

Click the 'register' button to fill out an online training request

Cost: No charge for trainings inside King County. Beyond King County, the cost is negotiable.

Register

April 19, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, April 19, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence      of justice involvement/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

May 14, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Friday, May 14, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

 

 

May 17, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, May 17, 2021, (12-1pm)

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the

veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

April 27, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen in          higher education.

  Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to                        withdrawals.

· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail ones academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here:  https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12203

**A Zoom link for this training we bill located in your registration confirmation email.**

April 21, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Wednesday, April 21, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

 

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can        contribute to poor outcomes for the victims.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12240

May 07, 2021 - 13:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Post-Traumatic Growth

Trainer: Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

When: Friday, May 7, 2021 (1-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

Adversity can lead to great suffering and also, in some situations, to positive transformation: Post-traumatic growth (PTG) refers to the positive psychological changes that can emerge as a result of struggling with adversity and trauma. These positive changes are different than the absence of, or recovery from, post-traumatic stress disorder. In recent years there have been great efforts to better understand and foster PTG in individuals who have experienced trauma and loss. In this half-day training, participants will learn a research-informed perspective on what PTG is and how we might be able to support its development in the clients we serve in clinical practice. Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to offer a richer understanding of the phenomenon of posttraumatic growth.

This training is designed for counselors, therapists, and other professionals working in similar therapeutic/helping roles.

**Note: this training is provided as information and education, and is not intended as therapy, healthcare, medical advice, or a doctor-patient relationship; if you have questions about the role of trauma in your life, please consult your healthcare provider.

Learning Objectives 

At the end of this training participants will be able to:

1. Define post-traumatic growth and differentiate it from resilience and recovery from PTSD

2. Explain 5 common types of post-traumatic growth

3. Describe 3 factors that make post-traumatic growth more likely to occur

4. Explain the risks and benefits of trying to foster post-traumatic growth in clinical practice

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12379

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

May 28, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Insomnia: Sleeping Better with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Trainer: Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

When: Friday, May 28 (9am-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

Sleep is essential for our physical health and our psychological health. Poor sleep is linked to concentration problems, poorer productivity and work performance, inability to fulfill our roles at work and home, risk for dangerous accidents, physical illness, pain, depression, and anxiety. Yet, about 30% of adults struggle with symptoms of insomnia, and this number is even higher amongst our Veterans at 50-60%. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) can help. CBT-I is an effective, science-based approach for helping people get better sleep – and doesn’t involve the use of medication. In this 6-hour training, participants will learn how to recognize factors that create and perpetuate sleep problems; how to calculate sleep efficiency; how to instruct clients in good “sleep hygiene” practices; how to appropriately guide the process of sleep restriction; and how to use principles of classical conditioning to improve sleep.

Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to offer a richer understanding of the treatment of insomnia. This training is designed for counselors, psychotherapists, nurses, physicians, and other professionals working in similar therapeutic/healthcare roles.

**Note: this training is provided as information and education, and is not intended as therapy, healthcare, medical advice, or a doctor-patient relationship; if you have questions about the role of insomnia in your life, please consult your healthcare provider.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this training participants will be able to:

1.           List three factors that create and perpetuate sleep problems

2.           Explain how to calculate sleep efficiency

3.           Define “sleep hygiene” and give three examples of these practices

4.           Explain the rationale for sleep restriction in treatment of insomnia

5.           Discuss how to use principles of classical conditioning to improve sleep event

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12385

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

June 18, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Trauma-Informed Care: How to Promote Safety, Trust, & Healing (Whoever You Are!)

Trainer: Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

When: Friday, June 18, 2021 (9am-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

The majority of adults have experienced at least one traumatic event in life, and trauma exposure is even more prevalent for our Veterans. Trauma can be like a thief, stealing our sense of safety, our ability to trust, our hope, and our sense of control over our own lives. All of these difficulties can impact our ability to take part in, and benefit from, the very services that are designed to help with healing. Trauma-informed care (also known as healing-centered engagement) can help. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is not a specific therapy method; instead, TIC is an overall approach to providing any sort of healthcare or social services, designed to meet people where they’re at and help them regain a sense of safety, trust, connection, hope, and control. In this 6-hour training, we will explore what trauma is; how stress and trauma impact our brains, our minds, and our lives; how to use core communication skills to connect with individuals who have experienced trauma; and how to change the environments where we deliver services in order to maximize safety and healing.

Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to offer a richer understanding of trauma informed care. This educational training is designed for people from a variety of professional backgrounds (i.e., it is NOT designed solely with mental health professionals in mind); Anyone who wishes to understand how they could play a role in making their professional environment more conducive to healing is most welcome.

**Note: this training is provided as information and education, and is not intended as therapy, healthcare, medical advice, or a doctor-patient relationship; if you have questions about the role of trauma in your life, please consult your healthcare provider.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this training participants will be able to:

1. Define trauma

2. Explain how trauma impacts the brain, the body, mental health, and relationships

3. Describe 5 key components of trauma-informed care

4. Explain two ways to tailor their own services and/or setting to be more trauma-informed

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12388

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

April 23, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Prolonged Exposure for PTSD Part 1 (VTSC, 6 CEUs)

Trainer: Scott Michael

When: Friday, April 23 (9am-4pm, PST)

Where: Online/Virtual

 

Description of Training:

Prolonged Exposure (PE) is cited as one of the primary evidence-based treatments for PTSD in the VA-DOD clinical practice guidelines.

Part 1: Dr. Michael provides training on each stage of the protocol so participants on that day receive training on all elements of the protocol. Participants will learn how to implement effective exposure therapy techniques for PTSD. Additionally, they will receive training in Veteran-specific applications of PE.

Part 2: (Fri, May 14 - 9am-4pm - You must register separately for this training)

Training is on “advanced topics” in imaginal and in vivo exposure techniques to help trainees advance their PE skills to the next level. We take a deeper dive into each modality – in vivo in the morning and imaginal in the afternoon – and Dr. Michael provides more in-depth training into Veteran-specific applications of PE.

To date, Dr. Michael has conducted 8 PE trainings for VTSC which have all received strong reviews.

Objectives of the Training:

1.Participants will be able to describe emotional processing theory of PTSD

2.Participants will be able to discuss how to use effective exposure therapy techniques for PTSD

3.Participants will be to identify Veteran-specific trauma structures and describe how to address those using

exposure techniques

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12627

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

May 14, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Prolonged Exposure for PTSD Part 2 (VTSC, 6 CEUs)

Trainer: Scott Michael

When: Friday, May 14 (9am-4pm, PST)

Where: Online/Virtual

 

Description of Training:

Prolonged Exposure (PE) is cited as one of the primary evidence-based treatments for PTSD in the VA-DOD clinical practice guidelines.

Part 2

Training is on “advanced topics” in imaginal and in vivo exposure techniques to help trainees advance their PE skills to the next level. We take a deeper dive into each modality – in vivo in the morning and imaginal in the afternoon – and Dr. Michael provides more in-depth training into Veteran-specific applications of PE.

To date, Dr. Michael has conducted 8 PE trainings for VTSC which have all received strong reviews.

Objectives of the Training

1.Participants will be able to describe emotional processing theory of PTSD

2.Participants will be able to discuss how to use effective exposure therapy techniques for PTSD

3.Participants will be to identify Veteran-specific trauma structures and describe how to address those using

exposure techniques

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12629

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

April 23, 2021 - 13:00 pm - 15:00 pm

Trainer: Laurie Lynch, Tacoma Rainbow Center

When: Friday, April 23, 2021 (1-3pm, PST)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

Whether you are new to learning about the LGBTQ community or consider yourself well-informed, this training will equip participants with current and accurate information surrounding laws, terminology, and more so that you can feel confident in your knowledge and be an effective ally to the LGBTQ community.

Goals

1.To increase knowledge about LGBTQ health/housing/employment needs.

2.To increase LGBTQ-affirming attitude

3.To increase LGBTQ-affirming behavior

Objectives

1.By the end of the 2-hour training, participants will be able to identify at least 3 risk factors that contribute to LGBTQ disparities in health, housing, and employment.

2.Participants will be able to enact at least two ways to affirm gender nonconforming people using gender-neutral language by the end of the training series.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12783

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

April 30, 2021 - 09:00 am - 11:00 am

Trainer: Laurie Lynch, Tacoma Rainbow Center

When: Friday, April 30th, 2021 (9-11am, PST)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

Society’s construction of gender, how it is defined, and how it is expressed has impacted us in ways we may not easily recognize. This, in turn, has created barriers for transgender and GNC (gender nonconforming) people to be affirmed in their gender identities. Learn more about gender identity, gender expression, and how to deconstruct social constructions of gender so you can be an effective ally and contribute to creating a sensitive, affirming, and welcoming space for trans and GNC folks.

*Note: LGBTQ Core Competency is required before taking this training.*

Goals

1. To increase knowledge about LGBTQ health/housing/employment needs.

2. To increase LGBTQ-affirming attitude

3. To increase LGBTQ-affirming behavior

Objectives

1. By the end of the Gender Identity training, participants will be able to convey at least one bias or stereotype they had about gender.

2. Participants will be able to enact at least two ways to affirm gender nonconforming people using gender-neutral language by the end of the training series.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12806

**A Zoom link will be included in your registration confirmation email**

June 04, 2021 - 09:00 am - 11:00 am

Trainer: Laurie Lynch, Tacoma Rainbow Center

When: Friday, June 4, 2021 (9-11am), PST)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

Whether you are new to learning about the LGBTQ community or consider yourself well-informed, this training will equip participants with current and accurate information surrounding laws, terminology, and more so that you can feel confident in your knowledge and be an effective ally to the LGBTQ community.

Goals

1.To increase knowledge about LGBTQ health/housing/employment needs.

2.To increase LGBTQ-affirming attitude

3.To increase LGBTQ-affirming behavior

Objectives

1.By the end of the 2-hour training, participants will be able to identify at least 3 risk factors that contribute to LGBTQ disparities in health, housing, and employment.

2.Participants will be able to enact at least two ways to affirm gender nonconforming people using gender-neutral language by the end of the training series.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12807

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

 

June 11, 2021 - 09:00 am - 11:00 am

Trainer: Laurie Lynch, Tacoma Rainbow Center

When: Friday, June 11, 2021 (9-11am, PST)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

Society’s construction of gender, how it is defined, and how it is expressed has impacted us in ways we may not easily recognize. This, in turn, has created barriers for transgender and GNC (gender nonconforming) people to be affirmed in their gender identities. Learn more about gender identity, gender expression, and how to deconstruct social constructions of gender so you can be an effective ally and contribute to creating a sensitive, affirming, and welcoming space for trans and GNC folks.

*Note: LGBTQ Core Competency is required before taking this training.*

Goals

1. To increase knowledge about LGBTQ health/housing/employment needs.

2. To increase LGBTQ-affirming attitude

3. To increase LGBTQ-affirming behavior

Objectives

1. By the end of the Gender Identity training, participants will be able to convey at least one bias or stereotype they had about gender.

2. Participants will be able to enact at least two ways to affirm gender nonconforming people using gender-neutral language by the end of the training series.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12808

**A Zoom link will be in your registration confirmation email**

 

April 28, 2021 - 15:30 pm - 17:00 pm

Trainer: Casey Metzger, Jason Alves

When: Wednesday, April 28th (3:30pm-5:00pm)

Where: Virtual/Zoom

CEUs Available: 1.5

Course Description: Veterans face enormous challenges as they transition from military to civilian life. Family members, friends and colleagues of veterans also face unique challenges in supporting those who served. COVID-19 presents new anxieties that may compound these factors. Forefront’s LEARN Saves Lives for Veterans training, developed in partnership with the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs, offers perspective on the unique challenges Veterans and their families face, and teaches essential skills for support and suicide prevention, specifically tailored to those who have served, their loved ones, and those who work with or support them.

Detailed Agenda:

  1. Introduction and public health issue of suicide
  2. Covers risk factors and experiences specific to veterans
  3. Suicide prevention skills using Forefront’s LEARN model
  4.  Includes imminent harm by lethal means (such as firearms)
  5. Prevention approaches practice
  6. Gives participants an opportunity to practice suicide prevention skills with their peers

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explain suicide's impact and understand why people die by suicide
  2. LEARN suicide prevention skills
  3. Integrate prevention approaches into your personal and professional life scribe your event

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/13053

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

Past Training

April 20, 2020 - 09:00 am - 13:00 pm

Trainer(s): Tory Durham, PhD

Details: Complex Post Traumatic Stress (C-PTSD) also known as Developmental Trauma Disorder, involves individuals who have been exposed to prolonged acute and relational trauma over an extended period of time. Complex Post Traumatic Stress often involves a disrupted-disorganized attachment style, co-occurring mental health issues, and elements of dissociation than can hinder regular trauma therapy. Personality disorders are rigid patterns and behaviors that are maladaptive and originate in early childhood as a result of relational-developmental trauma. In part three we will explore in greater detail the assessment methods discussed in parts one and two for clients struggling with Complex Post Traumatic Stress and Personality Disorders.

Objectives: 1. Understand how certain assessments, measures, and interviews may provide clues and insight into a client’s trauma history. 2. Understand how a Phase Oriented Consensus Model of trauma therapy can help clinicians do effective treatment planning. 3. Understand how a dissociative personality structure may contribute to challenges with accurate diagnoses and effective treatment. 4. Understand the role of psychoeducation in effective treatment.

Cost: FREE

Register

April 21, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Trainer(s): Ann Marie Roepke, PhD

Details: Description of Training: These are strange and frightening times. The global outbreak of coronavirus has impacted daily life in profound ways. More than ever, we need the skills and the relationships that help us to be resilient. Resilience is about making it through hard times with the least suffering and the greatest well-being possible. In this 6-hour training, participants will explore strategies for fostering resilience as they manage the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. These strategies are drawn from cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and positive psychology (PP). Topics we will cover include reconnecting with values, meaning, and purpose; addressing worrisome thoughts; boosting positive emotions; building high-quality connections; using mindfulness to lessen suffering; and identifying opportunities to advocate for change and to help others. This training will be provided online as a webinar in the interest of health and safety. Learning will include lecture, powerpoint slides, online interaction, and information about tools and activities to use on your own after the training.

Objectives: At the end of this training participants will be able to: 1) List three strategies for fostering resilience in the face of coronavirus-related stressors 2) Describe how cognitive therapy tools can be used to manage worrisome thoughts 3) Explain how to creatively use behavioral activation to boost mood during isolation/quarantine 4) Assess how, where, and when resilience strategies could be usefully applied in the participant’s own life and professional setting

Cost: FREE

Free CEs & Clock Hours: Workshop certificate documents hours of instruction toward Continuing Education. Clock-hour forms are available free upon completion of the workshop.
The Veterans Training Support Center is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. VTSC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Register

April 24, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Trainer(s): Ann Marie Roepke, PhD

Details: How can we help our clients make positive changes in their behavior -- without nagging, shaming, persuading, or arguing? Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based therapeutic approach that can help individuals change behaviors they might feel ambivalent about, such as exercising, changing their diet, quitting or reducing alcohol/drugs, adopting safer sex practices, taking important medications, engaging in behavioral activation, or starting psychotherapy. In this 6-hour advanced-level training, participants will build upon their existing MI skills through interactive and experiential learning activities. Participants will have the chance to: • Hone their ability to evoke change talk by using MI micro-skills (open-ended questions, affirmations, reflections, summaries) • Practice responding effectively to sustain talk and discord within the helping relationship • Give advice and information in a motivating way Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, experiential learning activities, and role plays designed to give them a richer understanding of the use of motivational interviewing in therapeutic and healthcare settings. This advanced-level training will emphasize role playing and other direct skill practice.

Objectives: At the end of this training participants will be able to: 1. Demonstrate two ways to evoke change talk 2. Demonstrate use of MI-consistent reflective listening 3. Demonstrate MI-consistent style of responding to sustain talk and discord 4. Describe basic methods of coding MI adherence and competence

Cost: FREE

Free CEs & Clock Hours: Workshop certificate documents hours of instruction toward Continuing Education. Clock-hour forms are available free upon completion of the workshop.
The Veterans Training Support Center is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. VTSC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Register

August 07, 2020 - 09:00 am - 12:00 pm

AgrAbility, Veterans and Agriculture – a strategic connection!
Learn about the AgrAbility program and the opportunities and technologies available.

Mission of AgrAbility
The vision of AgrAbility is to enhance quality of life for farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural workers with disabilities, so that they, their families, and their communities continue to succeed in rural America. For this target audience, "success" may be defined by many parameters, including: gainful employment in production agriculture or a related occupation; access to appropriate assistive technology needed for work and daily living activities; evidence-based information related to the treatment and rehabilitation of disabling conditions; and targeted support for family caregivers of AgrAbility customers. AgrAbility addresses a wide variety of disabling conditions in agriculture, including, but not limited to:

Arthritis
Spinal cord injuries/paralysis
Back impairments
Amputations
Brain injury
Visual impairments
Hearing impairments
Disabling diseases
Cerebral palsy
Respiratory impairments
Head injury

Join us to learn more!

Registration Link: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/10656

August 14, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Registration: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/10696

Title

“Law and Ethics of the Use of New Technology, Online Communications, and Social Media”

Description

While new and emerging technology can provide clinicians with powerful and effective clinical tools, it also has the potential to create a range of challenges as well. In this workshop we will address the legal and ethical implications of using new and emerging technology by behavioral health professionals. We will identify and discuss the evolving standards found in state law and in the professional codes of ethics. Participants will gain the ability to identify and implement a legally and ethically sound approach technology use, online communications and social media – with particular application to work with veterans. This course is intended to meet Law and Ethics CE requirements.

Learning Objectives

After taking part in this training, participants will be able to:

Identify the legal and ethical standards regarding clinicians’ use of new and emerging technology
Identify the legal and ethical standards regarding clinicians’ use of social media and online communication
Create strategies for effective and ethical online communication and social media use
Apply legal and ethical standards regarding online communications to clinical work with veterans

Law and Ethics of Effective Clinical Documentation

Eric Ström

Title

“Law and Ethics of Effective Clinical Documentation.”

Description

Effective record keeping is vital to effective clinical work and is a key part of sound professional practice. In this workshop we will examine Washington State and Federal legal standards regarding clinical documentation. We will also discuss documentation best-practices to support effective clinical work while minimizing risk of liability. Participants will gain increased understanding of the current standards regarding clinical documentation. This course is intended to meet ethics CEU requirements.

Objectives:

Locate and describe legal standards relating to clinical documentation

Create and evaluate strategies to use clinical documentation to best support effective work with clients

Apply best practice standards to clinical documentation of work with veteran clients

August 21, 2020 - 09:00 am - 12:00 pm

Complex Post Traumatic Stress & Personality Disorders Part Three

Course Description:
Complex Post Traumatic Stress (C-PTSD) also known as Developmental Trauma Disorder, involves individuals who have been exposed to prolonged acute and relational trauma over an extended period of time. Complex Post Traumatic Stress often involves a disrupted-disorganized attachment style, co-occurring mental health issues, and elements of dissociation than can hinder regular trauma therapy. Personality disorders are rigid patterns and behaviors that are maladaptive and originate in early childhood as a result of relational-developmental trauma.

In part three we will explore in greater detail the assessment methods discussed in parts one and two for clients struggling with Complex Post Traumatic Stress and Personality Disorders.

Course Objectives
Understand the role of psychoeducation and helpful resources for clients.
Understand how certain assessments measures may provide clues and insight into a client’s trauma history.
Understand how a Phase Oriented Consensus Model of trauma therapy can help clinicians do effective treatment planning.

Registration Link: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/10697

August 28, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Posttraumatic Growth Workshop for Mental Health Professionals (6 CE Hours)

A growing body of research shows that the negative effects of trauma can be transformed into opportunities for growth and a deeper sense of purpose. Assisting clients in moving beyond posttraumatic stress to posttraumatic growth is possible.This training will assist mental health professionals in identifying key elements of PTG and facilitating PTG growth with clients.

This workshop is designed to help you:
Comprehend the key elements of posttraumatic growth
Identify concepts and processes to assist clients in recognizing posttraumatic growth and how to recognize and facilitate posttraumatic growth (PTG) with clients.
Recognize how posttraumatic growth can stem from trauma/posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Gain knowledge about the latest research regarding PTG and how that information is helpful in assisting clients.

Participants will gain knowledge of:
Trauma, psychological distress and other factors involved in the development of PTSD
The history of the field of Posttraumatic Growth (PTG)
Assumptive World, Deliberate Rumination, Accommodation and other key PTG concepts and processes
The importance of support, disclosure, and affect regulation with PTG
The role of the therapist in PTG and the concept of Expert Companion
The biology of trauma and how it relates to both PTSD and PTG
Areas of growth as it relates to PTG
How to recognize posttraumatic growth and the role a narrative can play in facilitating posttraumatic growth with clients
Phases of PTG and the developing model for PTG
How to apply knowledge you gained during workshop with your clients

Registration Link: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/10699

September 11, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Advanced Confidentiality & HIPAA

Registration Link: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/10958

Details: Concern about the lack of confidentiality of mental health records may inhibit many veterans from seeking effective counseling services. This workshop will address state and federal laws regarding the limits of confidentiality for mental health counseling records. The workshop will also present strategies for maximizing the protection of confidentiality laws for the benefit of veteran clients. Among the topics to be covered are: lethality, duty to warn, and mandatory reporting; diagnosing and progress notes; insurance versus private pay; and government versus private records. This course is intended to meet ethics CEU requirements.

Training for Mental & Behavioral Health Professionals: This workshop is open to professionals with mental and behavioral health-related graduate degrees (e.g., MSW, MA, MS, MSN), physicians, dentists, and psychologists (e.g., AMA, ADA, APA), and those professionals who are qualified for membership in, or are members of their respective professional organizations. Graduate students in an accredited mental or behavioral health program may also participate in this training.

Objectives:
1. Understand the relationship between State Laws, HIPAA, and Professional Ethics Codes with respect to client confidentiality
2. Understand the legal requirements of clinical recordkeeping
3. Explore strategies for maximizing your ability to protect veteran client confidentiality

CEU available: 6

September 18, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Registration Link: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/10959

Description of Training:
Caring for others is a rewarding profession – and a demanding one. As providers in helping professions, how can we prevent burnout and attend to our own wellness? As supervisors, how can we care for our own well-being while also fostering the well-being of the individuals we supervise and mentor? Resilience-based approaches can help. In this 6-hour training, participants will explore strategies for fostering resilience and preventing burnout, including rediscovering meaning and purpose in our work, boosting positive emotions, building high-quality connections, bringing mindfulness into daily life, and identifying opportunities to advocate for environmental/systemic changes. Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to provide a richer understanding of strategies to foster resilience and prevent burnout in therapeutic and healthcare settings.

Objectives:
At the end of this training participants will be able to:
Describe the three key components of burnout
Explain three strategies for fostering resilience in the face of work-related stressors
Assess how, where, and when resilience strategies could be usefully applied in the participant’s own professional setting

Audience:
Supervisors in therapeutic, healthcare, and other supportive settings. Although core components of this training will be applicable to a range of healthcare/helping professions, this training is designed primarily for professionals working in mental health / behavioral health (e.g. clinical social workers, marriage & family therapists, mental health counselors, psychologists, etc.).

CEUs available: 6

October 09, 2020 - 09:16 am - {09}:{16} {am}

Law and Ethics of Mandatory Reporting and Duty to Warn/Protect
Eric Ström

“Law and Ethics of Mandatory Reporting and Duty to Warn/Protect”

Description:
For many clinicians, client lethality and mandatory reporting are some of the most difficult topics to navigate. In this workshop we will examine the applicable Washington State and Federal laws regarding mandatory reporting obligations with a specific focus on how these rules apply to behavioral health clinicians. We will also discuss the boundaries and standards of clinician liability for client harm to self or others as defined in recent Washington State case law. Participants will gain increased ability to implement strategies to minimize risk and to limit liability to best support their veteran clients. This course is intended to meet ethics CEU requirements

Objectives:
Describe Washington state legal standards regarding duty to warn/duty to protect
Locate and compare legal and ethical standards regarding mandatory reporting obligations
Create and evaluate strategies to meet legal reporting requirements while maximizing client support

Don’t Get Burned: What Behavioral Health Providers Need to Know about Washington Marijuana Laws - 2020
Eric Ström

Description:
The laws, regulations, and policies regarding the legal use of marijuana can cannabis are rapidly changing. Among the general public, there are many misperceptions and misunderstandings of the current rules. In this workshop we will examine Washington State and Federal legal standards regarding legal use of cannabis. We will also discuss legal and ethical issues relating to the use of cannabis by clinicians. Participants will gain increased understanding of the current laws regarding cannabis use to best support their veteran clients. This course is intended to meet Law & Ethics CEU requirements.

Outline
· Sources of Law and Ethics Standards
· Washington State Cannabis Laws
· Federal Cannabis Laws
· Clinicians and Cannabis
· Clients and Cannabis

Objectives:
Gain an understanding of Federal and Washington State cannabis laws
Analyze the interaction between Federal and State Controlled Substance laws
Apply Federal and State Controlled Substance laws to decision making as a credentialed healthcare provider
Recognize the potential impacts use of legal marijuana may have on clients

Please Note: This training is designed to be all day. The ZOOM link will be sent out the day prior to the training date.

October 16, 2020 - 09:00 am - 12:00 pm

Trainer: Michael Lillie, LMFT

Time: 9am-12pm

Course Description:
Complex Post Traumatic Stress (C-PTSD) also known as Developmental Trauma Disorder, involves individuals who have been exposed to prolonged acute and relational trauma over an extended period of time. Complex Post Traumatic Stress often involves a disrupted-disorganized attachment style, co-occurring mental health issues, and elements of dissociation than can hinder regular trauma therapy. Personality disorders are rigid patterns and behaviors that are maladaptive and originate in early childhood as a result of relational-developmental trauma.

In part three we will explore in greater detail the assessment methods discussed in parts one and two for clients struggling with Complex Post Traumatic Stress and Personality Disorders.

Course Objectives Part 3
1.Understand the role of psychoeducation and helpful resources for clients.
2.Understand how certain assessments measures may provide clues and insight into a client’s trauma history.
3.Understand how a Phase Oriented Consensus Model of trauma therapy can help clinicians do effective treatment planning.

Please Note: The ZOOM link will be sent out the day prior to the training.

October 23, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Posttraumatic Growth Workshop for Mental Health Professionals (6 CE Hours)

Time: 9am-4pm

A growing body of research shows that the negative effects of trauma can be transformed into opportunities for growth and a deeper sense of purpose. Assisting clients in moving beyond posttraumatic stress to posttraumatic growth is possible.This training will assist mental health professionals in identifying key elements of PTG and facilitating PTG growth with clients.

This workshop is designed to help you:
•Comprehend the key elements of posttraumatic growth
•Identify concepts and processes to assist clients in recognizing posttraumatic growth and how to recognize and facilitate posttraumatic growth (PTG) with clients.
•Recognize how posttraumatic growth can stem from trauma/posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
•Gain knowledge about the latest research regarding PTG and how that information is helpful in assisting clients.

Participants will gain knowledge of:
•Trauma, psychological distress and other factors involved in the development of PTSD
•The history of the field of Posttraumatic Growth (PTG)
•Assumptive World, Deliberate Rumination, Accommodation and other key PTG concepts and processes
•The importance of support, disclosure, and affect regulation with PTG
•The role of the therapist in PTG and the concept of Expert Companion
•The biology of trauma and how it relates to both PTSD and PTG
•Areas of growth as it relates to PTG
•How to recognize posttraumatic growth and the role a narrative can play in facilitating posttraumatic growth with clients
•Phases of PTG and the developing model for PTG
•How to apply knowledge you gained during workshop with your clients

Please Note: The ZOOM link will be sent out the day prior to the training.

October 30, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

Description of Training:
Cognitive-behavioral therapy is an evidence-based approach that can help clients improve their mood, manage anxiety and stress, and address other difficulties in functioning. In this 6-hour training, participants will explore cognitive and behavioral strategies for addressing depression, anxiety, stress, and other difficulties. Emphasis will be given to three key tools: cognitive restructuring, behavioral activation, and exposure therapy. Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to provide a richer understanding of cognitive-behavioral therapies.

Objectives:
At the end of this training participants will be able to:
•Describe the cognitive-behavioral model
•Explain how to use cognitive restructuring to help clients change maladaptive thoughts
•Create a hierarchy for exposure therapy to improve anxiety
•Describe how to plan and implement behavioral activation to improve mood

Audience: Direct service providers in mental health / behavioral health settings (e.g. clinical social workers, marriage & family therapists, mental health counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, behavioral health technicians, peer support specialists, etc.).

Please Note: The ZOOM link will be sent out the day prior to the training date.

Registration: Open
Event Date
Friday, Oct 30th.

Registration Closes

October 29, 2020 @ 12:30 pm

November 09, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11667

!!! Free CEU !!!

November 09, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Monday, Nov 9, 2020

TIME: 12-1

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the
veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11671

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

November 12, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery, and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Thursday, Nov 12, 2020

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can
contribute poor outcomes for the victims.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/register/11670

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

November 12, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language | The Role of Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What To Do About It

DATE: Thursday, Nov 12, 2020

TIME: 3-4pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

• Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
• Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
• Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
• Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
• Identify at least 3 potential resources available the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation
To examine the ways a brain injury can affect behavioral health interventions/treatments.
• To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
• To compare and contrast treatment approaches

To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
• Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
• Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
• Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
• To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners

Abstract
While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

November 13, 2020 - 13:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Trainer(s): Chalon Ervin Psy.D.

Details:

Transition can hard. One transition that is often overlooked is the transition from military personnel to civilian (Veteran Status). The Goal of this workshop is to increase knowledge, awareness, and understanding of transition and trauma and the associated psychosocial stressors. The workshop will address the signs and symptoms associated with trauma and PTSD. Additionally, comorbid diagnoses, assessment and the application of relevant treatments and behavioral strategies used in the treatment of trauma and PTSD will be discussed. The workshop will include theory and experiential skills-based learning.

Objectives:

1.Participants will understand how transition from military life can mimic PTSD symptomology.
2.Participants will understand what PTSD is, what makes it better, and what makes it worse.
3.Participants will be familiar with the physical, emotional, psychological and behavioral symptoms normally associated with trauma and PTSD.
4.Participants will better understand healthy coping strategies that can be employed to combat transitional stress.

Please NOTE: ZOOM links, to access the training, will be sent to the participant the day prior to the training.

CEU: Not CEU eligible

November 16, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event.cfm?id=11641
!!! Free CEU !!!

November 17, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2020

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1.Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11669

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

November 17, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the
The Washington Department of Veterans Affairs
Traumatic Brain Injury Program
Presented by Daniel Overton
MC, LMHC, MHP, CBIS

Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11624

November 18, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event.cfm?id=11641
!!! Free CEU !!!

November 19, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11667

!!! Free CEU !!!

November 19, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Thursday, Nov 19, 2020

TIME: 12-1

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the
veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11671

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

November 20, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

FINAL OFFERING FOR 2020/2021

Trainer(s): Keith Meyer, MS, LMHC; Trainer and PTG Advisory Committee Member

Time: 9am-4pm

Details:

Moral injury impacts not only people who have been in combat, but people from all walks of life who experienced different types of trauma and grief. This training provides an opportunity for mental health practitioners to obtain a comprehensive understanding of trauma, its connection to the development of moral injury, and the current methods utilized in the management of moral injury.

Objectives:

This workshop is designed to help you:

• Comprehend trauma, types of trauma, trauma events, and how cultural issues impact those traumatized.
• Identify the relationship between trauma and dissociation.
• Identify the impact of trauma on the assumptive world, and its connection to the development of moral injury.
• Recognize the connection between trauma and the development of PTSD and/or Moral Injury
• Identify the key components of moral injury and how it differs from PTSD
• Recognize the causes of moral injury and how it can affect individuals struggling to find meaning in their lives.
• Identify the psychological and physical impact of trauma and moral injury, including the effect on the brain.
• Assess & apply current methods utilized in the management of moral injury and identify/explain resources available to those affected by moral injury.

Cost: FREE

Free CEs & Clock Hours: Workshop certificate documents hours of instruction toward Continuing Education. Clock-hour forms are available free upon completion of the workshop.

November 23, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Tuesday, Nov 23, 2020

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11669

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

November 23, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
A webinar sponsored by The Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program
Presented by Daniel Overton
MC, LMHC, MHP, CBIS
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11624
!!! Free CEU !!!

November 30, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery, and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Wednesday, Nov 30, 2020

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can
contribute poor outcomes for the victims.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/register/11670

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

November 30, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language | The Role of Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What To Do About It

DATE: Monday, Nov 30, 2020

TIME: 3-4pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

December 01, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Tuesday, Dec 1, 2020

TIME: 12-1

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the
veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11671

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

December 02, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

December 2, 2020 12:00 - 13:00

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
1.Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to common Behavioral health presenting problems, diagnoses’ and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize/assess brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems and diagnoses’ typically seen in BH and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist behavioral health clients and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to presenting problems and diagnoses’.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to a lack of recovery.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a behavioral health diagnosis and/or the problem behavioral health client may present with. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to a lack of recovery. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect behavioral health. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to a BH diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Space is limited!
Register Here https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11641

!!! Free CEU !!!

December 03, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language | The Role of Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What To Do About It

DATE: Monday, Nov 30, 2020

TIME: 3-4pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

• Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
• Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
• Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
• Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
• Identify at least 3 potential resources available the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation
To examine the ways a brain injury can affect behavioral health interventions/treatments.
• To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
• To compare and contrast treatment approaches

To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
• Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
• Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
• Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
• To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners

Abstract
While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

December 03, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

December 3, 2020 12:00 - 13:00

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery, and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can
contribute poor outcomes for the victims.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11670

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

December 11, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

Description of Training:

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is an evidence-based approach that can help clients improve their mood, manage anxiety and stress, and address other difficulties in functioning. In this 6-hour training, participants will explore cognitive and behavioral strategies for addressing depression, anxiety, stress, and other difficulties. Emphasis will be given to three key tools: cognitive restructuring, behavioral activation, and exposure therapy. Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to provide a richer understanding of cognitive-behavioral therapies.

Objectives:

At the end of this training participants will be able to:

•Describe the cognitive-behavioral model
•Explain how to use cognitive restructuring to help clients change maladaptive thoughts
•Create a hierarchy for exposure therapy to improve anxiety
•Describe how to plan and implement behavioral activation to improve mood

Audience:

Direct service providers in mental health / behavioral health settings (e.g. clinical social workers, marriage & family therapists, mental health counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, behavioral health technicians, peer support specialists, etc.).

Registration: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11582
Please Note: The ZOOM link will be sent out the day prior to the training date.

December 14, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Monday, Nov 23, 2020

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11669

**A Zoom link will be emailed one day before the training**

December 15, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11667

!!! Free CEU !!!

December 15, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Tuesday, Dec 15, 2020

TIME: 12-1

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the
veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/register/11671

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the event**

December 16, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language | The Role of Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What To Do About It

DATE: Monday, Nov 30, 2020

TIME: 3-4pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

December 16, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Wednesday, Dec 16, 2020

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can
contribute poor outcomes for the victims.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11670

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the event**

December 18, 2020 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Coaching Clients Back into a Meaningful Life: Using Behavioral Activation to Treat CoMorbid PTSD and Depression

Presenter: Matthew Jakupcak, PhD

Biographic Summary:

Matthew Jakupcak is a clinical psychologist and researcher who has studied and treated psychological trauma, post-traumatic stress, and high-risk behaviors in military veterans, first-responders (i.e., firefighters, paramedics, police officers), and young male adults. Dr. Jakupcak has published more than 50 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters and presented at over 70 national and regional conferences and workshops on the topics of suicidal behaviors, interpersonal violence, and treatment interventions in trauma-exposed populations.

Background:

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), previously classified as an anxiety disorder in DSM-IV, is now one of the most widely recognized condition among DSM-5 trauma-related disorders. Prolonged exposure (PE), cognitive processing therapy (CPT), and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (EMDR) have robust support as effective, trauma-focused psychotherapies. However, there is a greater risk of treatment drop-out among trauma focused therapies relative to present-centered therapies, with growing evidence suggesting that long-term outcomes are comparable across trauma-focused and present centered therapies. One of the emerging present-centered therapy alternatives for PTSD is Behavioral Activation (BA). BA, an evidence-based therapy for major depression, has been further developed and applied for the treatment PTSD by the presenter and other independent researchers. The brevity, flexibility, and ease of learning BA makes it ideal for application in non-mental health settings, such as primary care and rehabilitation clinics. This workshop will review BA principles and structure, its application for the treatment of PTSD, and give attendees an opportunity to discuss clinical examples and role play BA intervention strategies. A Patient-Oriented BA for PTSD Workbook will be discussed as a resource for patients and providers.

Presentation Content:

Dr. Jakupcak will describe Behavioral Activation, a contextual behavioral psychotherapy approach shown to be effective for treating PTSD. He will describe the empirical support for BA for PTSD and present findings of a research study of BA for PTSD in returning Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans. Dr. Jakupcak will also provide case examples to illustrate core components of BA, as well as challenges of applying this approach to address PTSD in Veterans. Finally, Dr. Jakupcak will discuss how to use the “PTSD Behavioral Activation Workbook” with persons to guide/augment individual therapy.

Clinical Case Examples will be used to illustrate assessment and clinical intervention strategies and audience participation in Role-Playing and Open Discussions will be encouraged throughout the presentation.

Learning Objectives:

1) Attendees will be able to describe the theory and core components of Behavioral Activation (BA) used to treat Depression and PTSD
2) Attendees will become familiar with the empirical support for BA as a treatment for PTSD
3) Attendees will be able to describe research finding specific to a test of BA as a treatment for PTSD among returning Veterans
4) Attendees will be able to describe the “real world” clinical challenges and benefits of applying BA to treat PTSD.

REGISTER HERE: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11882

*Please Note* The Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training.

December 21, 2020 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Monday, Dec 21, 20201

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11669

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

December 22, 2020 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

December 16, 2020 15:00 - 16:00

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
Identify at least 3 potential resources available the the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways a brain injury can affect behavioral health interventions/treatments.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
To compare and contrast treatment approaches
To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners.

Abstract:

While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

CEUs Available: One (Free)

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

January 06, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Wednesday, Jan 6, 2021

TIME: 12-1

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the
veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11671

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the event**

January 06, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What to Do About It
Daniel Overton

Dates of Occurrence:
Monday, Nov 9, 2020 | Thursday, Nov 19, 2020 | Tuesday, Dec 1, 2020
Tuesday, Dec 15, 2020 | Wednesday, Jan 6, 2021 | Wednesday, Jan 20, 2021

TIME: 3-4pm
CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:
By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:
To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.
· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen
in higher education.
· Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to
withdrawals.
· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:
No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail one’s academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

To Register go to https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11667

January 07, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language | The Role of Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What To Do About It

Learning Objectives
By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
• Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
• Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
• Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
• Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
• Identify at least 3 potential resources available the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.
Goal of the Presentation
To examine the ways a brain injury can affect behavioral health interventions/treatments.
• To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
• To compare and contrast treatment approaches
To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
• Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
• Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
• Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
• To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners

Abstract
While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

CEUs Available: One (Free)

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

January 07, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Thursday, Jan 7, 2021

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can
contribute poor outcomes for the victims.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11670

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the event**

January 12, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Tuesday, Jan 12, 2021

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11669

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

January 13, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Wednesday Jan 13, 2021

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can
contribute poor outcomes for the victims.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11670

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the event**

January 13, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language | The Role of Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What To Do About It

DATE: Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021

TIME: 3-4pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11674

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

January 14, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue bout veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event.cfm?id=11641
!!! Free CEU !!!

January 20, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Wednesday, Jan 20, 2021

TIME: 12-1

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the
veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11671

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before this training**

January 20, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What to Do About It
Daniel Overton

Dates of Occurrence:
Monday, Nov 9, 2020 | Thursday, Nov 19, 2020 | Tuesday, Dec 1, 2020
Tuesday, Dec 15, 2020 | Wednesday, Jan 6, 2021 | Wednesday, Jan 20, 2021

TIME: 3-4pm
CEUs Available: One (Free)
Registration: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11667

Learning Objectives:
By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:
To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.
· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen
in higher education.
· Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to
withdrawals.
· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:
No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail one’s academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

January 22, 2021 - 13:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Veterans' Treatment Courts: Serving Justice-Involved Veterans

Trainer: Chris Wig
When: Friday, Jan 22 (1-4pm)
CEUs: N/A

Description:
Since 2008, Veterans Treatment Courts have integrated treatment and justice system case processing to better help veterans address substance abuse and mental health concerns, resolve criminal charges, and transform their lives. In this three-hour training, participants will explore the fundamentals of Veterans Treatment Courts. Participants will be introduced to core treatment court concepts, including roles played by members of the interdisciplinary team, monitoring abstinence through urine drug testing, and best practices for providing treatment services to justice-involved veterans.

Training Objectives:
At the end of this training participants will be able to:
1.Describe the 10 Key Components of Veterans Treatment Courts.
2.Explain how participation in Veterans Treatment Court may benefit veterans who are involved in the criminal justice system.
3.Understand how the interdisciplinary team works together to provide services to veterans enrolled in Veterans Treatment Court.

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12072

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

January 26, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A webinar sponsored by the Washington Dept of Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
The seminar is part of the WDVA's campaign to open up dialogue about veterans mental health and brain injury.
Space is limited! Register @ https://www.eventsquid.com/event.cfm?id=11641
!!! Free CEU !!!

January 27, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It
Daniel Overton

DATE: Wednesday, Jan 27, 2021

TIME: 12-1pm

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.
2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.
3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.
4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.
5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation:

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans
· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.
· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.
· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.
· To introduce resources available.

Abstract:

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

TO REGISTER: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/11669

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

January 29, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Law & Ethics

Trainer: Eric Strom
When: Friday, January 29, 2020 (9am-4pm)
Total CEUs: 6

Advanced Confidentiality with Veteran Clients

Description:
Concern about the lack of confidentiality of mental health records may inhibit many veterans from seeking effective counseling services. This workshop will address state and federal laws regarding the limits of confidentiality for mental health counseling records. The workshop will also present strategies for maximizing the protection of confidentiality laws for the benefit of veteran clients. Among the topics to be covered are: Federal and State confidentially standards, privilege, the basics of HIPAA, subpoenas, duty to warn, and mandatory reporting. This course is intended to meet ethics CEU requirements.

Objectives:
1.Identify legal standards relating to confidentiality;
2.Describe the difference between legal privilege and confidentiality;
3.Discuss the relationship between State Laws, HIPAA, and Professional Ethics Codes with respect to client confidentiality;
4.Formulate strategies for maximizing the ability to protect veteran client confidentiality

Releasing Health Information

Balancing the protection of client confidentiality against compliance with subpoenas and court orders can be both challenging and stress-inducing for may clinicians. An effective understanding of the legal and ethical requirements regarding confidently, subpoenas, client advocacy and in-court testimony is vital to effective clinical work and is a key part of sound professional practice. In this workshop we will examine legal and ethical standards regarding releasing client information within the legal system. We will also discuss best-practices to support effective clinical work with Veteran clients while minimizing exposure to liability. This course is intended to meet Law & Ethics CEU requirements.

Objectives:
1.Participants in this workshop will be able to:
2.Locate and describe legal and ethical standards relating to confidentiality and privilege
3.Locate and describe Federal and Washington State legal standards relating to clinical documentation
4.Create and evaluate strategies to for in court testimony and advocacy to best support effective work with clients
5.Apply best practice standards to responding to subpoenas and other court orders.

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12067

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

February 01, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Monday, Feb 1, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen in          higher education.

  Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to                        withdrawals.

· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail ones academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here:  https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12203

**A Zoom link for this training we bill located in your registration confirmation email.**

February 01, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, Feb 1, 2021, (3-4pm)

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the

veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

 

February 05, 2021 - 13:00 pm - 14:00 pm

LEARN SAVES LIVES for Veterans

Trainer: Codie Garza, MSPH, Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Veteran Services, Counseling & Wellness, WDVA

Time:1-2pm

THIS TRAINING DOES NOT MEET LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS

Course Description:

Veterans face enormous challenges as they transition from military to civilian life. Family members, friends and colleagues of veterans also face unique challenges in supporting those who served. COVID-19 presents new anxieties that may compound these factors. Forefront’s LEARN Saves Lives for Veterans training, developed in partnership with the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs, offers perspective on the unique challenges Veterans and their families face, and teaches essential skills for support and suicide prevention, specifically tailored to those who have served, their loved ones, and those who work with or support them.

Detailed Agenda:

•            00:00 – 00:30: Introduction and public health issue of suicide

o           Covers risk factors and experiences specific to veterans

•            00:30 – 1:15: Suicide prevention skills using Forefront’s LEARN model

o            Includes imminent harm by lethal means (such as firearms)

•            1:15 – 1:30: Prevention approaches practice

o            Gives participants an opportunity to practice suicide prevention skills with their peers

Learning Objectives:

1.           Explain suicide's impact and understand why people die by suicide

2.           LEARN suicide prevention skills

3.           Integrate prevention approaches into your personal and professional life

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12125

**A Zoom link will be emailed the day before the training**

 

 

February 09, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Speaking the Language of TBI | Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Tuesday, Feb 9, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
  • Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
  • Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
  • Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
  • Identify at least 3 potential resources available the the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways a brain injury can effect behavioral health interventions/treatments.

  • To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
  • To compare and contrast treatment approaches
  • To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
  • Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
  • Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
  • Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
  • To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners.

Abstract

While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12237

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

 

February 09, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

System Malfunction! |The Role of Brain Injury in Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Tuesday, Feb 9 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1.Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to common Behavioral health presenting problems,                     diagnoses’ and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize/assess brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems and diagnoses’ typically seen in BH and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist behavioral health clients and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to presenting problems and diagnoses’.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to a lack of recovery.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a behavioral health diagnosis and/or the problem behavioral health client may present with. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to a lack of recovery. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect behavioral health. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to a BH diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12164

**A Zoom link for this training will be located within your registration confirmation email**

February 10, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Wednesday, Feb 10th, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

 

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can        contribute to poor outcomes for the victims.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12240

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

February 10, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

The Monkey vs. The Organ Grinder | The Role of Brain Injury in Addictions and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Wednesday, Feb 10, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to Substance Use Disorder (SUD) and examine the prevalence of SUD/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to SUD and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by SUD and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

· To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to SUD.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a diagnosis of substance use disorder. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to an SUD diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12204

**A Zoom link will be included in your registration confirmation email**

February 12, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When:  Friday, Feb 12, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the

veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

 

February 12, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Friday, Feb 12, 2021 (3-4pm)

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12245

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation**

February 17, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Wednesday, Feb 17, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12245

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation**

February 17, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Wednesday, Feb 17, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen in          higher education.

  Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to                        withdrawals.

· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail ones academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here:  https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12203

**A Zoom link for this training we bill located in your registration confirmation email.**

February 19, 2021 - 09:00 am - 11:00 am

AgrAbility Assistive Technology for Working Farmers Online Workshop

Trainer: Kristen Hinton

Time: 9:00am - 11:00am

This training provides an overview of AgrAbility national history available Washington State services and technical support; and a review of resources to and products, designs, ideas and techniques to improve safety and independence.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12314

**A Zoom Link will be included in your registration confirmation email**

 

 

 

February 22, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

The Monkey vs. The Organ Grinder | The Role of Brain Injury in Addictions and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, Feb 22, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to Substance Use Disorder (SUD) and examine the prevalence of SUD/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to SUD and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by SUD and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

· To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to SUD.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a diagnosis of substance use disorder. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to an SUD diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12204

**A Zoom link will be included in your registration confirmation email**

February 22, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

System Malfunction! |The Role of Brain Injury in Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, Feb 22 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1.Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to common Behavioral health presenting problems,                     diagnoses’ and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize/assess brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems and diagnoses’ typically seen in BH and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist behavioral health clients and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to presenting problems      and diagnoses’.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to a lack of recovery.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a behavioral health diagnosis and/or the problem behavioral health client may present with. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to a lack of recovery. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect behavioral health. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to a BH diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12164

**A Zoom link for this training will be located within your registration confirmation email**

February 25, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language of TBI | Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Thursday, Feb 25, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
  • Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
  • Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
  • Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
  • Identify at least 3 potential resources available the the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways a brain injury can effect behavioral health interventions/treatments.

  • To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
  • To compare and contrast treatment approaches
  • To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
  • Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
  • Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
  • Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
  • To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners.

Abstract

While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12237

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

March 05, 2021 - 09:00 am - 11:00 am

Cannabis Use Disorder and Withdrawal (VTSC, 2 CEUs)

Trainer: Garth Terry, MD, PhD - Acting Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Radiology, University of Washington School of Medicine - Physician/Research Associate, Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) VA Puget Sound

When: Friday, March 5 (9am-11am)

Where: Virtual/Online

Objectives

1) Recognize the symptoms and clinical presentation of cannabis use disorder.

2) Describe cannabis withdrawal symptoms and their potential overlap with comorbid clinical disorders.

3) Develop a treatment plan for patients with cannabis use disorder, cannabis withdrawal, and/or cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12700

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

March 09, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Tuesday, March 9, 2021, (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence      of justice involvement/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

 

March 09, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Tuesday, March 9, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

 

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can        contribute to poor outcomes for the victims.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12240

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

March 11, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

The Monkey vs. The Organ Grinder | The Role of Brain Injury in Addictions and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Thursday, March 11, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to Substance Use Disorder (SUD) and examine the prevalence of SUD/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to SUD and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by SUD and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

· To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to SUD.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a diagnosis of substance use disorder. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to an SUD diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12204

**A Zoom link will be included in your registration confirmation email**

March 11, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

System Malfunction! |The Role of Brain Injury in Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Thursday, March 11 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1.Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to common Behavioral health presenting problems,                     diagnoses’ and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize/assess brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems and diagnoses’ typically seen in BH and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist behavioral health clients and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to presenting problems      and diagnoses’.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to a lack of recovery.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a behavioral health diagnosis and/or the problem behavioral health client may present with. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to a lack of recovery. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect behavioral health. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to a BH diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12164

**A Zoom link for this training will be located within your registration confirmation email**

March 12, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Assessing and Managing Suicide Risk (AMSR) 

Trainer: Kimberly Hardy

When: (9:00am - 4:00pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: 6

Description

47,000 Americans died by suicide in 2017, and sadly, over 14% of the completed suicides were Veterans. Despite increased funding and awareness, the Veteran suicide rate is still steady. Assessing and Managing Suicide Risk (AMSR) helps give clinicians the skills and confidence to meet suicide care standards and competencies. This training is designed for outpatient providers to assess and manage suicide risk with the goal of aiding in patient recovery. Clinicians will learn through group discussion, case examples, and videos, and should expect to participate in this class with a collaborative, non-adversarial and nonjudgmental stance. This course meets the Washington State requirements (RCW 43.70.442) for social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists.

Objectives

1.    Identify and apply the following core competencies to suicide prevention: maintaining an effective attitude and approach, collecting accurate assessment information, formulating risk, developing a treatment and services plan, and managing care.

2.    Demonstrate an increased willingness, confidence, and clarity in working with individuals at risk for suicide.

3.    Describe specific methods to better care for individuals at risk for suicide.your event

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12337

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

March 16, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12245

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation**

March 16, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Speaking the Language of TBI | Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
  • Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
  • Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
  • Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
  • Identify at least 3 potential resources available the the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways a brain injury can effect behavioral health interventions/treatments.

  • To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
  • To compare and contrast treatment approaches
  • To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
  • Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
  • Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
  • Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
  • To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners.

Abstract

While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12237

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

March 17, 2021 - 15:30 pm - 17:00 pm

LEARN SAVES LIVES for Veterans

Trainer: Codie Garza, MSPH, Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Veteran Services, Counseling & Wellness, WDVA

When: 3:30pm-5:00pm

Where: Virtual/Zoom

**THIS TRAINING DOES NOT MEET LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS**

Course Description:

Veterans face enormous challenges as they transition from military to civilian life. Family members, friends and colleagues of veterans also face unique challenges in supporting those who served. COVID-19 presents new anxieties that may compound these factors. Forefront’s LEARN Saves Lives for Veterans training, developed in partnership with the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs, offers perspective on the unique challenges Veterans and their families face, and teaches essential skills for support and suicide prevention, specifically tailored to those who have served, their loved ones, and those who work with or support them.

 

Detailed Agenda:

  1. Introduction and public health issue of suicide
  2. Covers risk factors and experiences specific to veterans
  3. Suicide prevention skills using Forefront’s LEARN model
  4.  Includes imminent harm by lethal means (such as firearms)
  5. Prevention approaches practice
  6. Gives participants an opportunity to practice suicide prevention skills with their peers

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explain suicide's impact and understand why people die by suicide
  2. LEARN suicide prevention skills
  3. Integrate prevention approaches into your personal and professional life scribe your event

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12566

 

 

 

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

March 19, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Facing Fear: Behavioral Approaches to Treating Anxiety

Trainer: Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

When: Friday, March 19, 2021 (9-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

How can we help our clients find freedom from anxiety? Behavioral treatment of anxiety is an evidence-based approach that can help individuals find relief from panic disorder, social anxiety, specific phobias, posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other presentations of anxiety. In this 6-hour training, participants will learn the fundamentals of behavioral treatment of anxiety from a transdiagnostic perspective (not focused on PTSD). Participants will gain a better understanding of the core principles and procedures that are used to help our clients face their fears and take back their lives from anxiety, with an emphasis on exposure (i.e., a process of safely confronting feared/avoided things). Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to give them a richer understanding of the application of behavioral approaches to treating anxiety.

**Note: this training is provided as information and education, and is not intended as therapy, healthcare, medical advice, or a doctor-patient relationship; if you have questions about the role of anxiety in your life, please consult your healthcare provider.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this training participants will be able to:

1. Explain the rationale for behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders

2. Describe the use of breathing retraining for managing anxiety

3. Explain the procedures used in exposure therapies

4. Construct an exposure hierarchy and describe how these hierarchies can be used in the treatment of              various anxiety disorders

5. Plan how to support clients’ motivation for engaging in exposure therapies

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12372

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

March 22, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

Stuck! | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It (Justice)

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, March 22, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to criminal/anti-social behavior and examine the prevalence of justice involvement/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it affects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to becoming involved with the justice system and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those working with veterans in the justice system.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with justice involved clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can lead to becoming justice                     involved.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors that can lead to becoming justice involved. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to behaviors that may lead to justice involvement and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12201

**A Zoom link for this event will be located within your confirmation email**

March 22, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

The Monkey vs. The Organ Grinder | The Role of Brain Injury in Addictions and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, March 22, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to Substance Use Disorder (SUD) and examine the prevalence of SUD/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to SUD and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by SUD and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

· To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to SUD.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a diagnosis of substance use disorder. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can affect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to an SUD diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register Here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12204

**A Zoom link will be included in your registration confirmation email**

March 24, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

A House of Cards | The Role of Brain Injury in Recovery and Recidivism and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Wednesday, March 24, 2021 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and examine the prevalence of homelessness/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury contributes to homelessness and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist caregivers working with homeless veterans.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with homeless clients/veterans.

·      To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

·      To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

·      Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on homelessness.

·      Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success.

·      Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment/recovery plans.

·      To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Studies estimate that 1 in 4 homeless are veterans. Related studies indicate approximately half the homeless population report brain injury with rates higher for the veteran population. Brain injury contributes to one becoming homeless and, if not addressed, will create significant difficulty overcoming chronic homelessness. This presentation will examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran and homeless population, how brain injury occurs, how it contributes to homelessness and provide tips and techniques to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12245

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation**

March 24, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Speaking the Language of TBI | Brain Injury in Tribal Behavioral Health

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Wednesday, March 24, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify symptoms and conditions that may be seen in BH that a brain injury affects, contributes to, exacerbates and/or creates.
  • Describe possible alterations/additions and/or changes in approaches to address brain injury in the behavioral health process.
  • Understand how the physical condition of the brain injury can translate to changes in behavioral health functioning.
  • Distinguish between clinical approaches that incorporate the brain injured client to those that don’t and the advantages of the inclusion.
  • Identify at least 3 potential resources available the the BH practitioner when encountering the brain injured client.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways a brain injury can effect behavioral health interventions/treatments.

  • To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of treatment by recognizing and incorporating brain injury into BH treatments.
  • To compare and contrast treatment approaches
  • To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:
  • Identifying brain injury in the assessment process
  • Helping clients in identifying and understanding brain injury
  • Incorporating brain injury symptoms/treatment in treatment plans
  • To introduce resources available to the BH practitioners.

Abstract

While a brain injury is a physical injury it can complicate many issues related to behavioral health. A brain injury is occurring every 9 seconds in the US. Odds are that at least 10% of any BH caseload has a hx of brain injury and the odds are higher in the veteran population, AIAN population and SUD treatment or anyone with a IPV history. The majority of all brain injuries are considered “mild”. Most that receive such an injury will not seek treatment and, if they do, will often not receive any treatment. This translates to the client not being aware that some of the symptoms they are experiencing may be due to a brain injury. 5-15% of these individuals will have ongoing, chronic symptoms. These symptoms often present as the primary problems for which one is seeking BH treatment/intervention. Due to the organic nature of the condition the brain injured client will not respond to treatment in the same fashion as the non-brain injured client. In addition, many of the symptoms (such as distractibility poor memory, etc.) can make treatment difficult and other symptoms (such as impulsivity and poor judgement) can create additional barriers to sustained success. IN this presentation, the participant will be led to discover how and why a brain injury can complicate the BH process, tips and techniques to deal with brain injured clients and resources to aid them.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12237

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

March 26, 2021 - 09:00 am - 11:00 am

Cannabis Use Disorder and Withdrawal (VTSC, 2 CEUs)

Trainer: Garth Terry, MD, PhD - Acting Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Radiology, University of Washington School of Medicine - Physician/Research Associate, Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) VA Puget Sound

When: Friday, March 26 (9am-11am)

Where: Virtual/Online

Objectives

1) Recognize the symptoms and clinical presentation of cannabis use disorder.

2) Describe cannabis withdrawal symptoms and their potential overlap with comorbid clinical disorders.

3) Develop a treatment plan for patients with cannabis use disorder, cannabis withdrawal, and/or cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12702

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

 

March 26, 2021 - 14:00 pm - 15:00 pm

Cannabis Use Disorder and Withdrawal (Non- CEU)

Trainer: Garth Terry, MD, PhD - Acting Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Radiology, University of Washington School of Medicine - Physician/Research Associate, Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) VA Puget Sound

When: Friday, March 26 (2:00-3:00pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

Objectives

1) Recognize the symptoms and clinical presentation of cannabis use disorder.

2) Describe cannabis withdrawal symptoms and their potential overlap with comorbid clinical disorders.

3) Understand the current evidence behind cannabis use in PTSD and the potential risks associated with                escalating use.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12705

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**

 

March 26, 2021 - 15:00 pm - {15}:{00} {pm}

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Friday, March 26, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

 

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can        contribute to poor outcomes for the victims.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12240

**A Zoom link for this training will be located in your registration confirmation email**

March 26, 2021 - 12:00 pm - 13:00 pm

System Malfunction! |The Role of Brain Injury in Behavioral Health, Recovery, and What to Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Friday, March 26 (12-1pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1.Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to common Behavioral health presenting problems,                     diagnoses’ and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize/assess brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems and diagnoses’ typically seen in BH and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist behavioral health clients and those clinicians involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to presenting problems      and diagnoses’.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to a lack of recovery.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and treatment plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to a behavioral health diagnosis and/or the problem behavioral health client may present with. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to a lack of recovery. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect behavioral health. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to a BH diagnosis and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12164

**A Zoom link for this training will be located within your registration confirmation email**

March 30, 2021 - 16:00 pm - 17:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 (4-5pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen in          higher education.

  Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to                        withdrawals.

· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail ones academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here:  https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12203

**A Zoom link for this training we bill located in your registration confirmation email.**

April 01, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Obstacles in the Road | The Role of Brain Injury in Higher Education and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton

When: Thursday, April 1, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to problems in higher education and examine the prevalence of brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects mood, behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injury in students.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury that interfere with the learning process.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goals of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can contribute to problems typically seen in students of higher education and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist students achieve successful outcomes.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured students/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury has on behaviors that can contribute to problems seen in          higher education.

  Helping faculty and staff identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to                        withdrawals.

· Incorporating brain injury into lesson plans and syllabi.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

No less than 1 in 5 veterans returning from OEF/OIF have a diagnosed brain injury, many more report having multiple concussive episodes. Both can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can lead to problems retaining information, processing and other issues that can de-rail ones academic course. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term successful completion of course work and contribute to withdrawal. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how it can affect academic performance. We will discuss ways a brain injury can contribute to typical problems seen in higher education and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here:  https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12203

**A Zoom link for this training we bill located in your registration confirmation email.**

April 12, 2021 - 15:00 pm - 16:00 pm

Broken! | The Role of Brain Injury in IPV/DV, Recovery and What To Do About It

Trainer: Daniel Overton, WDVA

When: Monday, April 12, 2021 (3-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

CEUs Available: One (Free)

 

Learning Objectives

By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify potential ways brain injury contributes to IPV/DV and examine the prevalence of IPV/DV/brain injury in the veteran population.

2. Describe the process of brain injury and how it effects behavior and cognition.

3. Understand how to effectively recognize brain injured clients.

4. Distinguish common symptoms related to brain injury.

5. Identify at least 3 intervention techniques specifically addressing brain injury.

Goal of the Presentation

To examine the ways brain injury can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can contribute poor outcomes for the victims and provide possible intervention techniques and strategies and resources designed to assist those affected by IPV/DV and those clinicians/Case workers involved in their care/treatment.

To discuss ways to increase effectiveness of working with brain injured clients/veterans.

· To compare and contrast intervention approaches and examine prevalence of brain injury in veterans

· To provide participants with innovative procedures that will aid in:

· Identifying the contributing factors brain injury that can happen as a result of IPV/DV, how brain injury can        contribute to poor outcomes for the victims.

· Helping providers identify how brain injury may be impeding success and contributing to recidivism.

· Incorporating brain injury into assessment and recovery plans.

· To introduce resources available.

Abstract

Statistics suggest that by the time a person reaches out for help for IPV/DV they present with a history of no less than 4 significant brain injuries. Some reports suggest that IPV/DV may occur 3-4 times as often in the veterans’ community than in the civilian population. A brain injury can contribute significantly to behaviors/cognitions that can increase risk for the victim to find themselves in yet another IPV/DV situation. If not addressed or identified these problems will create difficulty with long term changes/recovery and contribute to recidivism. In this presentation, the participant will be introduced to brain injury, its prevalence within the veteran community and how a brain injury can effect treatment. We will discuss ways a brain injury can result from IPV/DV, contribute to victimhood and be provided with resources and tools to increase successful outcomes.

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12240

April 16, 2021 - 09:00 am - 16:00 pm

Get After It! A Science-Based Approach to Staying Motivated and Achieving Goals

Trainer: Ann Marie Roepke, Ph.D.

When: Friday, April 16 (9-4pm)

Where: Virtual/Online

Description

As helping professionals, we often try to support people with making changes and achieving goals in their lives. If you’d like to expand your toolkit of strategies for supporting motivation and goal attainment, join us for this interactive 6-hour training. We’ll be exploring a range of science-based strategies for motivation, achievement, and habit change. Participants will have the opportunity to apply these tools to their own lives and their own goals in the interest of gaining a deeper understanding of the benefits (and the limitations) of each method.

Training participants will have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways including lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and experiential learning activities designed to offer a richer understanding of goal pursuit. This training is designed for anyone working in helping professions where motivation and goal attainment matter (i.e. it is not specifically designed for licensed professionals).

**Note: this training is provided as information and education, and is not intended as therapy, healthcare, medical advice, or a doctor-patient relationship; if you have questions about your mental/physical health goals, please consult your healthcare provider.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this training participants will be able to:

1.           Explain how to use mental contrasting with implementation intentions (WOOP)

2.           Coach someone in setting SMART goals

3.           List three principles of effective habit change

4.           Describe the use of “smart defaults” to support positive habit formation

5.           Explain the role of values clarification in goal pursuit

6.           List three ways to use Motivational Interviewing (MI) skills to support goal attainment

Register here: https://www.eventsquid.com/event/12375

**A Zoom link for this training will be included in your registration confirmation email**